Satellites find molten iron liquid jet-stream at Earth's core

Scientists working for the European Space Agency made the discovery using satellites that chart the Earth’s magnetic field.

    2017/01/03

NSFW    European Space Agency satellites have detected a large jet stream of liquid iron flowing beneath earth’s surface at a quickening pace.

The findings were published in the research journal, Nature GeoScience.

The stream is around 10,000 feet deep and moving beneath Canada and Russia at pace of 30 miles per year, reported the New Scientist. It is 260 miles wide and is nearly 20,000 miles long.

“We can explain it as an accelerating band of molten iron circling the North Pole, like the jet stream in the atmosphere”, lead researcher Dr. Phil Livermore said in a an article on the University of Leeds website.

This molten jet stream could be caused by buoyant forces in the earth’s core, or variations in the magnetic field within the core, explained University of Leeds Professor Rainer Hollerbach explained in a ESA article detailing the findings.
Satellites operated by the European Space Agency made the discovery by charting the Earth’s magnetic field. EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY
Satellites operated by the European Space Agency made the discovery by charting the Earth’s magnetic field. EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY
The stream was described “as an accelerating band of molten iron circling the North Pole”, by lead researcher Dr Phil Livermore. UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS
The stream was described “as an accelerating band of molten iron circling the North Pole”, by lead researcher Dr Phil Livermore. UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS
NEXT ON TOMONEWS
China planning to send probes to the moon, Jupiter and Mars

Facebook Conversation
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE