Iowa caucus explained: How the road to the White House begins here

Iowa is made up of 99 counties, divided into 1,681 precincts where party members will decide which delegates will go on to county conventions.

    2016/02/01

NSFW    Maximum Suffrage

IOWA — The Iowa presidential caucuses are upon us but the way in which Republicans and Democrats caucus is a bit different.

Iowa is made up of 99 counties, divided into 1,681 precincts where party members will decide which delegates will go on to county conventions.

Iowa Democrats will ultimately send 44 delegates to the Democratic National Convention where 2,382 out of 4,763 delegates are needed to win the nomination. Iowa Republicans will send 30 delegates to the Republican National Convention where 1,237 out of 2,472 delegates are needed to win.

During Republican Iowa caucuses, representatives will speak on behalf of candidates, and attendees will cast their vote by a show of hands or by paper ballot.

Democrats group together based on candidate. If a candidate doesn't receive at least 15 percent support, that candidate is considered inviable. Caucus goers must switch to a viable candidate's group or find an alternative precinct where their candidate does receive the minimum threshold.

Delegates from each party will then go on to attend the county conventions on March 12, followed by district conventions, state conventions and finally the national conventions, held in July.
If a democratic candidate doesn't receive at least 15 percent support, that candidate is considered inviable. REUTERS
If a democratic candidate doesn't receive at least 15 percent support, that candidate is considered inviable. REUTERS
The way in which Republicans and Democrats caucus is a bit different. REUTERS
The way in which Republicans and Democrats caucus is a bit different. REUTERS
NEXT ON TOMONEWS
New York Man traps pigeons and stuffs them into a bag to take home

Facebook Conversation
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE