Indonesia tsunami volcano loses two-thirds of its height

The Indonesian volcano which caused a tsunami that killed more than 400 people last week now measures only 110 meters after losing two-thirds of its height.

    2019/01/03

NSFW    SUNDA STRAIT, INDONESIA — The Indonesian volcano which caused a tsunami that killed more than 400 people last week now measures only 110 meters after losing two-thirds of its height.

Anak Krakatau is a stratovolcano located in the Sunda Strait. Stratovolcanoes form through the accumulation of layers of viscous lava and ash through multiple eruptions.

According to Volcano Discovery, the volcano has been active since around 1928. Its eruptions are strombolian.

According to Science Magazine, strombolian eruptions occur when gas inside the volcano form bubbles called gas slugs. Gas slugs then rise through the magma column and throw magma into the air when they burst.

Indonesia's Center for Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation has analyzed images of the volcano from a number of radar satellites, including the European Union's Sentinel-1 constellation, the German TerraSAR-X platform, and Japan's Space agency.

These show Anak Krakatoa, which used to stand at roughly 340 meters high, now just measuring 110 meters.

According to AFP, the steady eruptions caused rock and ash from the volcano to gradually slide into the sea causing it to lose about 150 and 180 million cubic meters of material.

Anak Krakatau, whose name translates to "Child of Krakatoa", was formed around 1928 in the crater left by Krakatoa, the infamous volcano whose massive eruption in 1883 triggered a period of global cooling.

According to local authorities, the tsunami caused by the eruption has left 7,202 people injured, 29 people missing and 43,386 people displaced.
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