Alzheimer's drug could regrow teeth without the need for fillings

Fillings and the dentist drill may soon be a thing of the past thanks to new findings from a group of UK-based researchers.

    2017/01/11

NSFW    LONDON — A team of British university researchers may soon eradicate the need for dentist fillings.

Dentists traditionally use fillings to repair tooth decay and holes in teeth, but these are often permanent, meaning the tooth’s protective minerals never fully regenerate.

According to a news release posted on the King’s College London website, scientists from the university have found that Tideglusib, a drug traditionally used to treat Alzheimer’s, can help teeth repair themselves.

During testing, biodegradable collagen sponges were given a protective coating and soaked with the drug before being inserted into moles in mice’s teeth, reported the BBC.

When the sponge began breaking down, researchers discovered that teeth were able to naturally heal themselves.

The team plans to carry out the next phase of testing on rats, reported the Guardian. If that’s successful, they will then apply to experiment on human patients in clinical trials.
Scientists from King’s College London have found that Tideglusib, a drug traditionally used to treat Alzheimer’s, can help teeth repair themselves. PIXABAY
Scientists from King’s College London have found that Tideglusib, a drug traditionally used to treat Alzheimer’s, can help teeth repair themselves. PIXABAY
The team carried out the research on mice. They found that by using the drug, the mice’s teeth were stimulated to heal themselves. NATURE
The team carried out the research on mice. They found that by using the drug, the mice’s teeth were stimulated to heal themselves. NATURE
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